BSN Salary

There’s a collective push to see registered nurses achieve a higher level of education and training than is required to meet the minimum requirements for licensure, and for good reason. Today’s RNs are working in an increasingly complex and demanding clinical environment, and that trend is only going to continue.

Current RNs who go back to school to step-up their competencies, along with new nurses who can hit the clinic floor on day one with a higher level of training, are simply more adept at providing the kind of exceptional care that results in better patient outcomes and lower readmittance rates. And they’re able to do it all at a lower overall cost too. Even before the era of COVID-19 these were big talking points in the healthcare industry; at this stage of the game, these things have far bigger and more sweeping implications.

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Grand Canyon University
B.S. in Nursing (Registered Nurse - R.N to B.S.N.)
Purdue University Global
Online RN-to-BSN
SNHU
B.S. in Nursing (RN to BSN) and an Accelerated RN to MSN
Walden University
Online Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN)
Capella University
Online RN-to-BSN

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing is the gold standard for today’s RNs, and whether you earn it as your initial degree and path to the RN or return to school to advance your education beyond the ADN or RN diploma, it pays off in dividends, both in terms of professional opportunities and earning power.

Keep reading to learn more about the BSN and where it can take your career and your salary:


BSN Salary Information By State

The Move to the BSN: A Look at the Increasing Demand for BSN-Prepared RNs

Salaries for BSN-Prepared RNs in Different Roles

State-by-State Guide to What BSN-Educated RNs are Earning

What Salaries are Like for BSNs in Major Cities Around the Country



The Move to the BSN: A Look at the Increasing Demand for BSN-Prepared RNs

While the RN diploma or associate degree (ADN) remains the minimum educational requirement to earn an RN license, the BSN is quickly replacing these paths to RN practice. With higher levels of education associated with everything from lower mortality rates to fewer medication errors, the nation’s biggest players in issues affecting the practice of nursing—including the Institute of Medicine, the American Organization of Nurse Executives, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National League for Nursing, and the American Nurses Association— all agree that both aspiring and practicing RNs should set their sights on the BSN.

The BSN is becoming more than a recommendation, too. Among the nation’s largest employers, it’s quickly becoming a requirement.

For example:

  • All of the nation’s Magnet hospitals (recognized by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) as demonstrating excellence in nursing and patient care and innovation in professional nursing practice) now require all nurse managers and nurse leaders to hold a BSN or graduate degree in nursing. All Magnet hospitals must also have clear plans that show they’re working toward the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation of achieving an RN workforce in which at least 80% are baccalaureate-prepared.
  • The U.S. armed forces require the BSN to practice as an active-duty RN.
  • To earn a promotion beyond the entry-level, RNs with the Veteran’s Administration must earn the BSN.

An August 2018 American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) survey revealed that 45.6% of all hospitals and other healthcare settings now require new hires to hold the BSN, while nearly 89% of all employers expressed a “strong preference” for BSN program graduates.

And in response to this increased demand and/or preference, today’s RNs are upping their educational pursuits.

A 2017 National Nursing Workforce Survey conducted by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing found revealed that 45% of all RNs held the BSN as their highest level of education in 2017 – an increase from 40% in 2013. During the same period, the percentage of RNs with the RN diploma as their highest level of education decreased from 12% in 2013 to 6% in 2017, while the percentage of RNs with the associate’s degree as their highest level of education also decreased from 31% in 2013 to 29% in 2017.

Salaries for BSN-Prepared RNs in Different Roles

Salary stats for RNs don’t tell the whole story because, chances are, if you hold the BSN, you’ll enjoy a salary that beats out your RN colleagues with a diploma or ADN. According to a 2019 Medscape RN/LPN Compensation Report, RNs with a bachelor’s degree earned an annual, average salary of $80,000, while those with the ADN earned just $75,000.

With the BSN on your resume, you’ll not only qualify for jobs with some of the largest, most respected employers, you’ll also set yourself up for nurse leader/manager/supervisor positions that almost always come with a bigger paycheck. PayScale, which provides accurate, real-time salary data based on more than 54 million total salary profiles, reveals an average, annual salary of $84,974 for BSN nurses, as of September 2020.

PayScale also highlights some of the senior-level nursing jobs available to BSN-prepared RNs and their average salaries during this time:

  • Clinical nurse manager: $86,577
  • Nursing manager: $89,432
  • Nurse case manager: $73,172
  • Nursing director: $90,803

State-by-State Guide to What BSN-Educated RNs are Earning

Perhaps even more telling are salary averages gathered from recent job postings. ZipRecruiter, a leading online employment marketplace, provided the following average salaries for BSN nurses (as of September 2020) using current salaries gathered from the more than seven million jobs posted daily on the site.

The following average state salaries were calculated using only those nursing jobs that require the BSN:

  • Alabama: $69,669
  • Alaska: $79,394
  • Arizona: $73,981
  • Arkansas: $70,166
  • California: $78,277
  • Colorado: $74,804
  • Connecticut: $80,148
  • Delaware: $74,905
  • Florida: $67,266
  • Georgia: $71,369
  • Hawaii: $83,086
  • Idaho: $73,182
  • Illinois: $69,784
  • Indiana: $73,506
  • Iowa: $72,080
  • Kansas: $73,662
  • Kentucky: $76,361
  • Louisiana: $72,830
  • Maine: $73,127
  • Maryland: $80,174
  • Massachusetts: $86,509
  • Michigan: $70,128
  • Minnesota: $75,096
  • Mississippi: $68,993
  • Missouri: $68,831
  • Montana: $74,750
  • Nebraska: $78,964
  • Nevada: $78,771
  • New Hampshire: $84,194
  • New Jersey: $76,016
  • New Mexico: $70,396
  • New York: $87,335
  • North Carolina: $64,052
  • North Dakota: $78,472
  • Ohio: $74,312
  • Oklahoma: $73,390
  • Oregon: $74,915
  • Pennsylvania: $75,556
  • Rhode Island: $79,496
  • South Carolina: $75,165
  • South Dakota: $76,181
  • Tennessee $74,852
  • Texas: $70,549
  • Utah: $73,629
  • Vermont: $79,064
  • Virginia: $77,929
  • Washington: $85,906
  • West Virginia: $75,923
  • Wisconsin: $74,135
  • Wyoming: $78,404

What Salaries are Like for BSNs in Major Cities Around the Country

BSN-prepared RNs in major metro areas often earn even more, as highlighted by the following ZipRecruiter average salaries for each state’s largest city as of September 2020:

  • Birmingham, Alabama: $73,759
  • Anchorage, Alaska: $89,614
  • Phoenix, Arizona: $83,519
  • Little Rock, Arkansas: $78,161
  • Los Angeles, California: $91,894
  • Denver, Colorado: $87,443
  • Bridgeport, Connecticut: $89,393
  • Wilmington, Delaware: $86,412
  • District of Columbia: $93,639
  • Jacksonville, Florida: $81,111
  • Atlanta, Georgia: $86,971
  • Honolulu, Hawaii: $85,093
  • Boise, Idaho: $78,031
  • Chicago, Illinois: $88,846
  • Indianapolis, Indiana: $83,221
  • Des Moines, Iowa: $86,790
  • Wichita, Kansas: $77,435
  • Louisville, Kentucky: $82,081
  • New Orleans, Louisiana: $82,686
  • Portland, Maine: $84,678
  • Baltimore, Maryland: $88,232
  • Boston, Massachusetts: $93,757
  • Detroit, Michigan: $86,250
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota: $88,866
  • Jackson, Mississippi: $83,973
  • Kansas City, Missouri: $84,007
  • Billings, Montana: $86,020
  • Omaha, Nebraska: $81,825
  • Las Vegas, Nevada: $82,008
  • Manchester, New Hampshire: $84,961
  • Newark, New Jersey: $89,832
  • Albuquerque, New Mexico: $77,991
  • New York City, New York: $95,197
  • Charlotte, North Carolina: $83,826
  • Fargo, North Dakota: $86,639
  • Columbus, Ohio: $84,182
  • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: $79,843
  • Portland, Oregon: $86,652
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: $86,578
  • Providence, Rhode Island: $86,753
  • Charleston, South Carolina: $81,695
  • Sioux Falls, South Dakota: $83,459
  • Nashville, Tennessee $84,343
  • Houston, Texas: $85,994
  • Salt Lake City, Utah: $86,790
  • Burlington, Vermont: $85,410
  • Virginia Beach, Virginia: $79,831
  • Seattle, Washington: $94,220
  • Charleston, West Virginia: $78,731
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin: $85,623
  • Cheyenne, Wyoming: $84,416

 

Salary and employment data compiled by PayScale in September 2020. Figures represent accumulated data for all employment sectors in which behavior analysts work. PayScale salary data represents average and median earnings for the occupations listed and includes workers at all levels of education and experience. This data does not represent starting salaries. 

Salary and employment data compiled by ZipRecruiter in September 2020. Figures represent accumulated data for all employment sectors in which behavior analysts work. ZipRecruiter salary data represents average and median earnings for the occupations listed and includes workers at all levels of education and experience. This data does not represent starting salaries. 

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